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Top D-FW commercial real estate deals for the week of Aug. 20

Gordon Partners

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Sales

Houston-based Gordon Partners has acquired Green Oaks Plaza, a 100,000 square foot retail center on West Pleasant Ridge Rd. in Arlington. The new owner plans to remodel the shopping center, its eighth acquisition since 2011.

Frontline Holdings has purchased the Westview apartments, a 334-unit apartment community located at 201 W. Southwest Parkway in Lewisville. JLL’s Mark Brandenburg handled the transaction with financing from Voya Financial.

A Texas investor purchased a medical office building at 930 W. Main in Lewisville. The 10,060-square-foot building sold for $3.3 million. Stan Johnson Co’s Tom Georges and Jon Cohen brokered the sale by a New York investor.

An investor has purchased a warehouse at 3640 Marquis Drive in Garland. Matt Spellman of TIG Real Estate Services brokered the sale.

A Texas investor has purchased Pioneer Plaza, a 51,390-square foot shopping center in on East Davis Street in Mesquite. Dallas’ Strive Real Estate brokered the sale of the 85 percent leased retail center by a group of investors.

Leases

Tire Profiles Inc. has expanded its lease to 16,377 square feet of industrial space at 3060 W Story Rd. in Irving. Michael W. Spain of Bradford Commercial Real Estate negotiated the lease.

Obstacle Warrior Kids has leased 15,701 square feet of retail space in the Gateway Plaza shopping center on Southlake Boulevard in Southlake. Chad Albert with NAI Robert Lynn and Josh Beliak of Shop Cos negotiated the lease with David Levinson and Jack Weir of the Retail Connection.

Camp Bow Wow, a dog day care, boarding, training and in-home pet care facility, has leased 12,000 square feet at 1200 Texan Trail in Grapevine. Pete Danna and Layne Mayfield with CBRE negotiated the lease with Matthew Thompson and Phillip Rosenfeld with Lee & Associates.

Rexel USA leased 11,701 square feet of industrial space at 716 S Greenville Avenue in Allen. Brett Lewis and George Tanghongs of Lee & Associates negotiated the lease with CBRE.

Hobart AVL & Event Rentals has leased 10,500 square feet of commercial space at 2840 Guilder Drive in Plano. George Tanghongs and Brett Lewis of Lee & Associates negotiated the lease with Tyler Tillery of NAI Robert Lynn.

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage has merged three North Texas offices in a new 8,800-square-foot location in Southlake. The new Southlake regional office is at 850 E. State Highway 114 and will support 200 sales agents. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage has 14 offices and 920 agents serving Dallas-Fort Worth. Josh Bryan of Tenant Real Estate Advisors and Geoff Shelton and Marshall Mays of Holt Lunsford Commercial negotiated the lease.

M+W Group leased 7,868 square feet of commercial space at 1001 Klein Road in Plano. Brett Lewis & George Tanghongs of Lee & Associates negotiated the lease with Cushman & Wakefield.

Signature Salon Suites leased 6,000 square feet of retail space at 3601 Regent Boulevard in Irving. Thad Beckner from Inroads Realty negotiated the lease.

Mario’s Mexican and El Salvadorian Restaurant has leased 4,376 square feet of retail space at Village at Eldorado at FM 423 in Little Elm. Thad Beckner from Inroads Realty negotiated the lease with Taylor Roberts with CBRE.

Prodapt North America leased 3,634 square feet of office space at 1333 Corporate Drive in Irving. Derek Alexander with Hartman Income REIT negotiated the lease with Cassie Watts with Cresa Partners.

Real estate editor Steve Brown compiles this list.

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Unique homes: These luxury units in Dallas’ Design District are selling for $750,000

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North Texas residents have lots of housing choices.

But finding your dream home in Dallas-Fort Worth doesn’t have to mean a standard 3-bedroom in the ‘burbs or a matchbox-sized apartment in Uptown.

There are as many housing alternatives these days as there are personal tastes in dwelling units. From old warehouses to sleek new high-rises, there’s something for everyone if you are willing to look for it.

One of them is on Vantage Street, an unusual address for a luxury residence.

Instead of the country-club crowd, your neighbors include a hardwood flooring firm, auto repair shop and upholstery shop.

And the Design District building that houses two posh homes that are for sale started out as a sewing factory. Now the old warehouse off Wycliff Avenue near the Hilton Anatole Hotel has two deluxe residential units that each have 2,500 square feet. They are listed for sale at $750,000 and $800,000.

"It was built in 1967 by Trammell Crow," said contractor Jeff Bales who’s selling the properties. "A nut and bolt factory used to be in here and it was probably 20 different businesses over the years.

"The buildings down here are well built and have high ceilings and are wide open."

Bales finished both of the units with bright white and brick walls, stained concrete floors and luxury fixtures in the kitchens and baths. One unit has its own swimming pool and both of them overlook the Trinity Strand Trail, which runs alongside the property.

"I’ve had three showings yesterday and two the day before," said real estate agent Paige Whiteside who’s marketing the two lofts. "There are at least 20 couples living down here and there is a Design District homeowners associations."

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Dallas and other Texas metros make new list of U.S. boomtowns

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With all the construction cranes on the highway and business moves to the area, it’s no surprise that Dallas has ended up on a new list of the country’s biggest boomtowns.

All of Texas’ major metros ended up near the top of the new ranking by Magnify Money.

Dallas ranked in seventh place in the comparison of top U.S. growth cities.

"Americans are flocking to and prospering in Texas," Kali McFadden with Magnify Money, a consumer finance website, said in the report. "Texas metros take up one-third of the top 15 spots."

Austin was rated the top U.S. boomtown in the report. And San Antonio was just after Dallas in ninth place.

Magnify Money ranked cities on factors including population growth, housing and rising employment and incomes.

"The first thing we looked at was how much business and industry has grown locally," McFadden said. "We not only wanted to know how many new businesses there are but also how businesses in general are doing, as measured by their increase in hiring and — for businesses that don’t have employees, known as non-employers — how much revenue has increased."

While Texas towns hogged the beauty contest, cities in the Northeast and Midwest were near dead last in the ratings.

Some cities in Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut and Ohio saw their labor forces and the number of businesses shrink for the 5-year period used in the comparison.

North Texas has been one of America’s fastest growing markets since the Great Recession, leading the county in job gains and population growth.

Source: Magnify Money

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Leasing Begins at Terra Lago Lakefront Apartments in Rowlett, Texas

Terra Lago lakefront apartments in Rowlett, Texas (Photo: Business Wire)

DALLAS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Abode Properties a subsidiary of Transcontinental Realty Investors Inc., (NYSE: TCI) a Dallas-based real estate investment company, is pleased to announce leasing has begun at its Terra Lago asset. The class A asset will become part of the Southern Properties Capital portfolio.

“Terra Lago is our largest complex built at one time in Texas. The asset is a great achievement for our ever expanding portfolio.”

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“Leasing activity has formally commenced and tenants will start occupancy over the next several weeks,” said Daniel Moos, CEO and President. “Terra Lago is our largest complex built at one time in Texas. The asset is a great achievement for our ever expanding portfolio.”

Terra Lago is a 451 unit Midrise Multi-Family community located along the east line of Scenic Drive in the far eastern portion of Rowlett, Texas. The property has water frontage along Lake Ray Hubbard.

The Class A property is designed with three and four story mid-rise apartment buildings. The Lakeside location will offer one, two, and three bedroom apartments with high-quality amenities and stunning lake views. A structured parking garage with entry at each floor level, temperature controlled corridors and cyber lounges are the comforts and conveniences offered. Interior features will include granite countertops, ceiling fans, 2" faux wood blinds, pendant lighting, kitchen islands, oval garden tubs, walk-in closets, patios and balconies, walk-in pantries, and eat-in kitchen bars. Select units offer double vanities and bath linen closets. Exterior amenities will comprise of resort style pools, decked courtyards with water features, tanning ledges, BBQ grills, fitness centers, business center and a bocce ball court.

Rowlett is just 20 minutes from downtown Dallas north of IH-30, surrounded by more than 30 miles of shoreline on beautiful Lake Ray Hubbard, and home to over 62,000 residents. This Multifamily-friendly setting is conveniently located near all the fine dining, shopping, and entertainment that Rowlett has to offer.

Abode Properties is a subsidiary of Transcontinental Realty Investors Inc., (NYSE: TCI), a Dallas-based real estate investment company. Abode’s investment and strategic focus is to acquire, develop, and operate a portfolio of desirable multifamily residential properties, while capitalizing on our ability to obtain long term and static debt structures. The portfolio stands to benefit from historically established, proven, and successful operational practices, seasoned on-site management, and an experienced leadership team with forward thinking capabilities in order to realize maximum cash flows and consistent returns, while maintaining unequaled resident and customer service. We are disciplined and prudent allocators of capital and we will continue growing our geographically diverse portfolio from the Southwest to the Southeast. These markets are geographically located in areas of the country that correspond with both sustainable and viable economic growth activity. All of Abode Properties means one thing – “Home”.

Transcontinental Realty Investors maintains a strong emphasis on creating greater shareholder value through acquisition, financing, operation, development, and sale of real estate across every geographic region in the United States. A New York Stock Exchange company, Transcontinental is traded under the symbol “TCI”. Transcontinental produces revenue through the ownership and professional management of income producing apartments and office buildings that are “undervalued” or “underperforming” at the time of acquisition. Value is added under Transcontinental ownership, and the properties are repositioned into higher classifications through physical improvements and improved management. Transcontinental has dramatically expanded its development capabilities associated with luxury apartment homes through its wholly owned subsidiary Abode Properties, principally on land it owns or acquires.

Southern Properties Capital operates primarily in Texas and specializes in Class A multifamily assets in emerging markets throughout the Southern United States, corresponding with both sustainable and viable economic growth activity. The issuing entity is backed by over 3,000 multi-family units (out of a total of approximately 8,000 owned and operated by TCI), as well as over 1.5 million square feet of office buildings in Texas. The company has already used funds to acquire additional multi-family assets within its strategic footprint, and expects significant expansion by continuing to utilize the Israeli bond platform.

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D-FW builders got thousands of new home, apartment permits. How many are coming to your city?

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New residential construction in Forth Worth is outpacing all other municipalities in the metro, according to a Dallas Morning News analysis of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development data.

The city logged 5,053 new homebuilding permits in the first six months of the year, according to preliminary data from the federal agency. The majority of the permits — 2,763 — are for multifamily developments, which include apartment complexes as well as town homes, condos and duplexes.

"It’s been a very active market," said Jim Gaines, chief economist at the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University.

Across the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, real estate developers have filed for permits to build more than 67,000 housing units, during the first half of 2018.

Fort Worth’s housing market isn’t as constricted as Dallas’ — which only had 3,915 permits filed in through June despite its larger size — so it makes sense that the plurality of new construction will take place in Cowtown.

Along that vein, Dallas had far more multifamily permits filed — 3,125 — than single family, reflecting the difficulty of building homes in a market that’s facing increasing land and labor costs.

"The city of Dallas doesn’t get too many single-family starts, but you do get rebuilds. So much of the single family in the Dallas side (of the metroplex) is happening outside the city limits," Gaines said.

Hence the brisk permit numbers for both single and multi-family developments in small-but-growing suburbs and exurbs to the north and south of Dallas like Prosper, Celina, Midlothian and Frisco, the country’s fastest growing city, which tallied the third most permits through the first half of the year: 1,440.

Of course, the same constriction in the detached single-family home market in Dallas proper is also driving growth in rental units, of which Dallas is adding plenty.

Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

McKinney, another high-growth city, looks a little different. Builders there filed 1,147 permits in 2018, but all but six were single-family.

Like many of the bedroom communities around Dallas and Fort Worth, it’s predominantly a single-family market, Gaines said — though there is demand for apartments there.

"Multifamily tends to go in clumps," he said. "What’ll happen is there’ll be one or two or three projects that have 150-200 units a piece. Once those are done, nobody will want to build because they’ll think the market is full. I’m guessing that for the first half of the year, people got nervous there were already too many apartments."

That said, some so-called bedroom communities are adding multifamily units at a level expected of larger urban centers — towns like Garland, Richardson, Grand Prairie and Farmer’s Branch all notched hundreds of multifamily permits this year.

"They were suburban communities 40 or 50 years ago, but now they’re exhibiting the concept of the suburban activity center replacing the traditional downtown. Some of these outlying areas have basically become cities unto themselves," Gaines said.

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Biker doing “wheelies” crashes, closes Dallas-area freeway

SOUTHLAKE, Texas — Police in a Dallas-Fort Worth suburb blame a crash that shut a freeway on stunts being performed by a group of about 100 motorcyclists.

Authorities in Southlake say one of the bikers popping wheelies on the Texas State Highway 114 crashed near the border of Southlake and Grapevine. That caused a traffic backup for about an hour when the freeway had to be closed.

At least one person was hurt in the wreck Saturday but the severity of the injury wasn’t immediately known.

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Amenities are nice, but are Dallas renters paying the price?

Dallas apartment renters are typically getting more than they wanted, and that could upsize expenses, according to a new Apartment List report.

A study of 70 metro areas found, on average, Dallas rental properties have excessive amenities that many renters do not want. Dallas trails only fellow Texas city Houston in the entire nation in the excessive amenities index.

The report juxtaposed potential renters’ preferences with amenities offered by more than 4 million units Apartment List has on its online platform. Some of the amenities observed were in-unit laundry, balconies, hardwood floors, cat friendliness and pools.

While searching for apartments, only 8 percent of Dallas renters sought cat friendliness, an amenity offered by 80 percent of rental properties in the city, according to the report. That leaves a gap in demand of 72 percent.

"(Dallas) has undergone a pretty substantial amount of new construction in recent year," Salviati said. "All of the new apartment buildings that are coming online, I think, tend to be well-equipped with modern amenities."

Priceonomics, a data research company, estimated amenities like pet friendliness, laundry and private outdoor areas could have a 5 percent impact to rental costs in Dallas. And the inclusion of a fitness center and parking facilities at a complex would increase rent by 10 percent and 15 percent, respectively.

A two-bedroom apartment in Dallas currently costs $1,100, according to Apartment List. That means, on average, renters in Dallas may be paying $165 per month for parking at their apartments.

Other overabundant amenities included pools, with a 45 percent gap in demand; gyms, with a 37 percent gap; dishwashers, with a 27 percent gap; and balconies, with a 14 percent gap.

In contrast, 56 percent of the renters in Dallas wanted in-unit laundry, but only 15 percent of properties offered it. Dallas apartments are also undersupplied with hardwood floors. Salviati said that trend is consistent throughout the nation.

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Dallas County Sheriff’s Office Mourns Deputy

DALLAS, TX — Dallas County Sheriff’s Office announced Friday the death of one of its own. Deputy Homero Calderon was found dead Friday morning from a seemingly self-inflicted gunshot wound in southern Dallas County near Hutchins, the sheriff’s office said.

Interim County Sheriff Marian Brown issued a statement regarding Calderon’s death.

Read it in full here:

"There are no words that can accurately describe the sadness we are experiencing due to his loss. This tragedy has touched each of us in different ways. We, in public safety, have difficult jobs that come with unique challenges and dangers, coupled with regular life stressors that make it easy for us to become overwhelmed. As law enforcement professionals, we often mask emotion to do our jobs on a day-to-day basis helping people and we forget or ignore that we often need help ourselves. We ask for time to mourn our loss and the passing of this dedicated officer. It is imperative that Deputy Calderon’s family."
Deputy Calderon started his career at the Sheriff’s Department in November 2, 2000. He worked as a Detention Service Officer at the West Tower Detention Facility before attending the Sheriff’s Academy and being promoted to Deputy Sheriff in September 2008. After graduation, Deputy Calderon worked in the Dallas County Jail before being transferred as an investigator to the Sheriff’s Department Warrant Execution Section.
Deputy Calderon was an integral part of our law enforcement team and a member of our family at-large. His death is a shock to us all, and we offer our full support and condolences to his family.

A suicide prevention lifeline is available at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Anyone can call, including someone who feels suicidal or in distress or someone who is worried about a friend/family member.

Image via Dallas County Sheriff’s Office

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Mobile homes could be a solution for affordable housing in Dallas – Dallas Business Journal

At a time when affordable housing in the United States, even in Dallas, is hard to find, a new report says manufactured homes, commonly referred to as “mobile homes,” could be the solution.

Today, mobile homes are the largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the U.S., with one in ten mobile home households living below the poverty line, according to Apartment List.

In Dallas, the median cost live in a mobile home is $696 per month, compared to $1,132 to live in a non-mobile home. On average, mobile home residents spend 40.5 percent less on housing costs than those living in non-mobile homes.

But the report found the number of mobile homes is decreasing at a time when affordable housing for low-income families is most needed, with the share of mobile homes in the United States at its lowest level since the 1980s. In 2016, three percent of Dallas households lived in mobile homes, down from 4.4 percent in 20150.

Sydney Bennet, senior research associate for Apartment List, told the Dallas Business Journal there has been a 31 percent decrease in the share of households living in mobile homes in Dallas.

“Dallas, as with every other large urban city, has seen a drop in their share of households living mobile homes over the past decade and a half, in part because of rising land values and the ability to build other types of housing,” Bennet said. “The more expensive a metro is, you tend to see an even bigger gap and lack of options for the poorest families.”

The number of mobile homes took off after World War II to meet the growing demand for affordable housing and in 1980, when President Ronald Reagan cut the budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). In the 2000s, mobile home sales dropped off, as loans for traditional homes were more readily available.

Mobile homes are faster and cheaper to build than traditional homes. Whereas high construction costs and labor shortages mean builders can’t build fast enough to meet demand, mobile homes are built in factories, transported to a site, and installed. Mobile homes cost as little as $45,000, compared to the median price of $323,000 for a new site-built home, according to Curbed.

“When you look at the cost of a mobile home, you realize how hard it is to find other properties at that same price point that can house a family,” Bennet said.

But mobile home owners face similar problems to renters, such as rent increases and evictions. Moving a mobile home is difficult and costs $5,000 on average, or nearly two months of pay for the average mobile home household. Mobile homeowners often do not own land and must take out Chattel mortgages, which often come with higher interest rates than standard mortgages, on their homes.

In January, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-sponsored mortgage lenders, announced it would purchase 30,000 manufactured housing loans over the next three years in response to a “duty to serve under-served markets” rule issued by the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

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Why Lubbock, TX, is hot: Texas Tech, Buddy Holly and wine

(Photo: Dan Fellner/Special for The Republic)

LUBBOCK, Texas – Like its favorite son, rock ‘n’ roll legend Buddy Holly, this city of a quarter-million people on the high plains of west Texas is far more than a one-hit wonder.

True, most of the nearly 6 million visitors to Lubbock each year come to learn about the life and legacy of Holly, a musical pioneer who had a profound influence on such artists as the Beatles, Rolling Stones and James Taylor.

Lubbock’s 3 big draws

Elizabeth Backo/azcentral.com

But tourists are learning that Lubbock also has a burgeoning wine industry that is beginning to draw comparisons to California’s Napa Valley, a rich ranching history, and a surprisingly vibrant arts scene anchored by a major university, Texas Tech.

John Osborne, president of Visit Lubbock, the city’s tourism bureau, says people are discovering the city he calls a “hidden gem.” Osborne says that Lubbock, which is about a 12-hour drive or a two-hour nonstop flight from Phoenix (American Airlines offers daily flights), has experienced a 30 percent increase in tourism over the last nine years. Sixteen hotels with 1,400 rooms have opened since 2014, bringing the city’s capacity to 6,400 rooms.

Despite some perceptions to the contrary, Lubbock isn’t just another hot, flat, dusty, west Texas town with blowing tumbleweeds, oil derricks and endless cotton fields.

“Most people who have never been to Lubbock have a preconceived notion of what it’s like,” Osborne said. “And what they find out is that it’s very different. There’s actually a lot of culture here, there’s a lot of excitement. There’s a lot of energy and a lot of fun things to do.”

Wine tasting in Lubbock
About 90 percent of the wine grapes in Texas are grown within a 100-mile radius of Lubbock.

(Photo: Dan Fellner/Special for The Republic)

During a recent four-day visit, I particularly enjoyed learning about the growing west Texas wine industry and visited six wineries. About 90 percent of the wine grapes in Texas are grown within a 100-mile radius of Lubbock, many in fields that used to yield less-profitable cotton.

West Texas produces a wide variety of reds, white and rosés. I sampled everything from locally made Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec to lesser-known varietals such as Trebbiano and Viognier.

Locals will tell you that Texas wines can hold their own with some of the best wines produced in California and France. Indeed, several wineries have more ribbons on display than you’ll find at a military parade. Texas wines routinely win national and international competitions.

“When you start looking at the California wines, west Texas has a very similar type of climate and therefore we produce very similar wines,” Osborne said. “Many of the wine connoisseurs will put west Texas wines up against any of them made in California.”

For the cost-conscious wine aficionado, Lubbock is a tempting alternative to California wine country. A tasting at a Lubbock winery costs $5-$10, a fraction of what Napa Valley wineries typically charge. If you want to take a bottle or two home, a high-end, award-winning Texas wine can be had for less than $20.

Buddy Holly’s home town
This statue of rock ‘n’ roll legend Buddy Holly is in downtown Lubbock.

As for Holly, he draws visitors to Lubbock from all over the world. He was hugely popular in Germany, England and France. Several sites commemorate the singer/songwriter’s trailblazing contributions to the music industry.

Born in Lubbock in 1936, Holly was known for his trademark black horn-rimmed glasses and such hits as “That’ll Be the Day,” “Peggy Sue” and “Oh, Boy!” He died in 1959 at the age of 22 in a plane crash in Iowa that also killed performers Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson. Don McLean, in his iconic 1971 song “American Pie," hauntingly referred to the tragedy as “the day the music died.”

Holly’s historical importance is tastefully chronicled at the Buddy Holly Center, in the heart of the city’s Depot Entertainment District. It features a museum full of memorabilia from Holly’s short life. I was especially moved to see a display with the glasses Holly was wearing when he died in the plane crash.

The Buddy Holly Center pays homage to Lubbock’s native son.

Outside the museum, there is a statue of a guitar-strumming Holly in front of the West Texas Walk of Fame, which honors Holly and other notable musicians, including Waylon Jennings, Mac Davis and Roy Orbison.

To pay your respects to Holly, visit his modest grave in the municipal cemetery. On his granite headstone you’ll find all sorts of gifts left by fans, including flowers, coins and guitar picks. When I visited, someone had left a pair of high-heeled shoes, perhaps worn by a woman with fond memories of dancing to Holly’s music.

As a way of honoring Holly’s contributions to the local arts scene, Lubbock is building a $155 million, 2,200-seat theater named the Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts & Sciences, which is scheduled to open in early 2020.

Texas Tech and the arts scene
The Texas Tech campus in Lubbock has 88 pieces of art including this sculpture called "Agave Dreams" by Julian Voss Andreae.

Lubbock is home to three universities, the largest being Texas Tech, which has about 35,000 students. Its sprawling 1,839-acre campus is the second largest in the country (behind the Air Force Academy).

Walking from one end to the other is like walking through an art gallery as there are 88 outdoor sculptures on display. The eclectic collection has been named one of the top 10 public art collections in the U.S. by Public Art Review magazine.

The entrance to Lubbock’s largest museum, the National Ranching Heritage Center.

Lubbock’s largest museum, the National Ranching Heritage Center, is affiliated with Texas Tech and is located on the northern edge of campus. Even though the museum is in the heart of the city, visitors feel like they’re in a rural area in a different century.

The 27-acre site houses 30 transplanted structures related to the city’s ranching history dating back between 100-170 years. It’s a fun way to learn about the lives of the frontier settlers and the challenges they faced.

Prairie Dog Town
Lubbock’s Prairie Dog Town is home to thousands of the burrowing rodents.

Finally, no trip to West Texas is complete without a visit to the quirky Prairie Dog Town, created in 1935 by a Lubbock man who was concerned about the possible extinction of the species. It was the first protected prairie-dog colony in the country.

The burrowing rodents now number in the thousands in a natural habitat in the city’s Mackenzie Park. You can get within a few feet of the critters, although they’ll likely try to scare you off with a high-pitched bark.

Visit Lubbock’s Osborne says Lubbock may not have the glitz and glamour of more popular Texas destinations like San Antonio and Dallas, but for those wanting an authentic Texas experience steeped in wine and history – especially in the areas of music and ranching – Lubbock is hard to beat.

“There’s a chance to learn about Texas history right here in one town,” he says. “It’s an affordable place to come. It’s an easy place to get to and you get the West Texas hospitality that is so famous.”

More about Lubbock

• Visit Lubbock: www.visitlubbock.org.

• The Buddy Holly Center: www.mylubbock.us.

• Caprock Winery: www.caprockwinery.com.

Dan Fellner is a faculty associate at Arizona State University and freelance travel writer. Visit his website at global-travel-info.com.

MORE STORIES BY DAN FELLNER

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