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Vintage Decorating Tips For Apartments Far North Dallas

Apartments Far North Dallas

If you are looking for apartments Far North Dallas, you want to think about how you are going to decorate your apartment once you move in. If you enjoy decorating and you love the vintage look, you might want to decorate your apartment in a vintage style. Vintage decor is charming and the look is easy to achieve if you know what you are looking for. Read on to learn some decorating tips that will help you create a great look for your apartment.

You don’t need to spend a lot of money to achieve the vintage style. This style is very easy to achieve and it is also affordable. The first step to getting the vintage look is to think about what era you want to replicate. You might be interested in the ’60s, ’80s, or even the ’50s. There are so many different eras you can choose and you want to decorate in the era that speaks most to you.

Once you decide the era you can start thinking about how you want to decorate. You are going to want to use a variety of decorating materials. You can purchase inexpensive vintage prints for the walls and you can also go to thrift stores to find vintage plates and glasses. If you are looking for affordable furniture you can also buy furniture at the thrift stores and find some great pieces when you look for furniture there.

You have a lot of choices and you can also pick up some amazing vintage pieces at antique stores and flea markets. Flea markets are fun to shop at because you never know what you are going to find and there are a lot of interesting choices when you shop at the flea markets. There is always something new to choose from and you can usually find a wide variety of products to choose from.

You can find lots of great pieces at the flea markets and the prices are very cheap which means you get to enjoy some huge savings. You won’t have to spend a lot of money when you visit the flea market and you have some great choices when you shop there. Try not to buy too many pieces because you won’t have a lot of room when you are living in an apartment. The apartment is going to be tight on space and you want to make sure that you don’t pack in too much furniture into your apartment or it is going to look cluttered.

You don’t want to live in apartments Far North Dallas that are too cluttered or you won’t have enough room and your apartment is not going to feel very comfortable. Try to only pick out a few pieces so you don’t feel too overwhelmed and keep things simple so you don’t get a cluttered look. A good apartment is going to look amazing and it is going to have all the furniture and accessories you need to enjoy living in a vintage apartment.

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Did a Dallas council member benefit from a zoning change he pushed? An ethics panel wants to talk about it

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With less than a week away from the start of early voting in Dallas, a preliminary panel of the city’s Ethics Advisory Commission has moved to investigate a complaint against City Council member Philip Kingston for possibly benefiting from a zoning change in his own neighborhood in East Dallas.

The allegation, made anonymously through the City Auditor’s office, states that Kingston shouldn’t have pushed to allow Accessory Dwelling Units — often known as mother-in-law suites or granny flats — in the Belmont Addition Conservation District.

Kingston challenged the complaint’s validity and disputed that he received any economic benefit from the zoning case.

But shortly after a City Council vote on Jan. 9 approving those changes — in which Kingston voted in favor — he and his wife Melissa pulled a permit for a second-floor addition of a detached garage at his home near Lower Greenville.

Months before, Melissa Kingston had filed a conservation district work review form with the city’s Department of Sustainable Development and Construction, proposing to remodel their kitchen and “expand [their] existing garage loft.”

The complaint claimed that Kingston knew that this vote and his promotion of ADUs would “affect his own economic interests” since they could be rented out, yet he chose to proceed anyway.

Doing so, the complaint stated, was in violation of the section of the city’s Code of Ethics that bars city officials or employees from taking “any official action that the city official or employee knows is likely to affect particularly the economic interests” of themselves.

On Tuesday, the preliminary panel focused its attention only on two limited questions: whether the complaint stated a valid claim under Chapter 12A, and whether it was supported by “just cause” — essentially whether it was legally sufficient.

On both questions, the panel split on a 2-1 vote, with vice chair Royce West II and commissioner Scott Shirley voting in favor, and commissioner Rob Cañas voting against.

The decision forwards the complaint to an evidentiary hearing by the full commission; a date for that hearing will be set later this week, said City Secretary Bilierae Johnson.

Kingston has long championed bringing Accessory Dwelling Units to Dallas.

In June 2018, when the City Council approved methods to allow for granny flats to be built, Kingston praised the move as an opportunity to address some of Dallas’ affordable housing needs. Neighborhoods would become “more resilient and sustainable” with income and age diversity, he said.

Kingston did not attend Tuesday’s ethics panel meeting, nor did he respond to a request for comment by The Dallas Morning News.

But in a written response submitted prior to the meeting, Kingston challenged the complaint on both questions considered by the preliminary panel.

First, he stated that since the complaint was made anonymously from a “member of the public” through the office of Interim City Auditor Carol Smith, there was no way to verify that the person bringing the allegations met residency or jurisdictional requirements found elsewhere within Chapter 12A.

City staff told the panel that those requirements only “come into play when a non-anonymous complaint comes through the City Secretary’s office.”

Kingston also stated that a council vote on something as broad as an overlay “does not create a special effect on the economic interests an individual council member that is distinguishable from the effect on the economic interests of other members of the public.”

Kingston cited a 2015 Texas Attorney General decision where planning and zoning commissioners in Beaumont weren’t required to recuse themselves from votes to amend a historic district in which they lived. He also pointed to a 2017 Dallas City Council vote in which his colleague Sandy Greyson did not recuse herself voting in favor of increasing the homestead exemption for seniors, even though Greyson was part of that “specific class of residents” who benefited by a policy change.

Shirley, the ethics commissioner, said just cause was found in the allegations. The complaint, he said, wasn’t only about the City Council vote, but the manner in which zoning change — an overlay — made its way to the City Planning Commission in the first place.

The complaint alleged that the Belmont Addition Conservation District did not follow the newly created paths to allow for ADUs, circumventing those routes through Kingston’s appointee on the City Plan Commission, Paul Ridley.

“The overlay has a very specific process that you have to go through,” Shirley said. “And in the complaint, they point out that it doesn’t follow either one of those processes.”

The upcoming hearing won’t be Kingston’s first trip in front of the city’s Ethics Advisory Commission. He received a letter of reprimand in 2017 after violating ethics rules when he filmed a campaign ad in his City Hall office.

The complaint came as Kingston seeks a fourth — and final — two-year term on the City Council. He represents District 14, which is made up of parts of Downtown Dallas, Uptown, East Dallas and Oak Lawn.

Kingston is running against financier David Blewett and business owner Warren Johnson.

Early voting in Dallas runs from April 22 to April 30. Election Day is May 4.

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Mediterranean Estate In Dallas Includes Stunning Pool

Photo of 4343 Beverly Dr, Highland Park, TX 75205 (realtor.com)

HIGHLAND PARK, TX — A large master bedroom, movie theater, and massive kitchen are just some of the must-see features included in this 8,955 square foot home for sale in Highland Park. The home was built in 2009. Learn more about the listing below.

Price: $3,750,000 Square Feet: 8955 Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 4 Full and 4 Half Baths Built: 2009 Features: Elegant entertaining and luxurious living define 4343 Beverly Drive. This gorgeous estate has it all! From the address to the hand crafted finish-outs and generous spaces. Enter to formal living and dining rooms that set a sophisticated tone. A cheerful open kitchen and den at the back of the house overlook the beautiful infinity pool. Upstairs the master suite is truly a wing of its own, with a resort-like bath and roomy closets. Plenty of guest and kid bedrooms form another wing on the second story. Below ground you will find a theater for movie night and a gym, as well as a spacious 6-car garage. Tons of storage, a stately office, separate bar area: what does this home not offer?

This listing originally appeared on realtor.com. For more information and photos, click here.

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Dallas Cowboys legend Michael Irvin posts on Instagram that he is cancer-free

Michael Irvin posted the picture on the left on his Instagram account to announce that he is cancer-free. The picture from the right is from before he had a throat biopsy done. (Source: Michael Irvin’s Instagram page)

Irvin wrote in the post that his doctor at UCLA Medical has informed him that he is cancer-free. Earlier this week, the Hall of Famer had a throat biopsy done to be on the safe side.

“Thank you God for continuing to answer Prayers and Thank you AL for praying,” Irvin wrote in his Instagram post Sunday.

The former NFL wide receiver said that his doctor told him that all of his tests came back 100 percent clean.

“It is impossible to press my family and my appreciation for the overwhelming outpour of love, support, and prayers,” Irvin wrote in the post. “I was on my threshing floor dealing with the stronghold of fear. You all covered and encouraged me. To God be the glory.”

God is good!!! So thankful for the good news. My man is cancer free!!

“Growing up in the ghetto of Ft Lauderdale the one thing you have to conquer to get out is FEAR,” Irvin wrote in the Instagram post. “I did! As a football player, the no fear gift served me well as a blessing and an asset on the field, but sometimes off the field, it’s been a curse and a liability.”

Irvin said the situation started during the previous football season when the Dallas Cowboys beat the New Orleans Saints. Irvin wrote in his Instagram post that he was so elated and excited that he lost his voice. Then the problem persisted for two months, he said.

“To give background I share with you that I loss my father at the young age of 51,” Irvin wrote in the Instagram post. “He had throat cancer. This daemon has chased and vexed me deep in my spirit all my life.”

“I am TERRIFIED!!” Irvin admitted in his post. “My Faith tells me whenever you face great fear, you go to your greatness power. Mine is God. Mine is God. I am asking all who will. Could you please send up a prayer to help my family and I deal with whatever the results may be?”

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The best places to stargaze, Dallas’ waterfall billboard and more from Curious Texas’ spring break

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Happy Friday, Curious Texans! We have a special spring break edition of our newsletter this week. We’ve published more than 50 Curious Texas stories since January. Here are the 10 you read the most:

1. What are the best places to stargaze in Dallas-Fort Worth? Dallas has one of the brightest skies in the U.S. because of the size of our city. The glow from artificial lights masks deep-space objects and the disk of our own Milky Way galaxy, a cloudy stripe that arcs overhead from one horizon to the other.

2. What’s the story behind Dallas’ famous waterfall billboard? Wild stories surround Dallas’ waterfall billboard, built for San Antonio’s Pearl Brewing Co. in 1962, from college pranks to a sunken $15,000 Cartier watch.

3. Just how big is Collin County’s boom? Collin County is set to have over 2.4 million residents by 2050, according to the Texas Demographic Center. That’s more than three times its population in 2010.

4. What’s the history behind the Little Mexico Village apartments in Uptown? The apartment’s peach Spanish-style buildings that sit next to multi-million dollar high-rise condos can catch anyone’s eye as they drive through the neighborhood.

5. Why did Texans start drinking hot Dr Pepper with lemon? When icy temperatures hit North Texas, some opt for coffee, tea or hot chocolate. But there was a time when some Southerners had a hankering for something a bit more homemade. All they needed for this special winter drink was a saucepan, a lemon and Dr Pepper.

6. Reunion Arena has been gone for nearly 10 years. Why was it demolished? This year marks the 10-year anniversary of Reunion Arena’s demolition — after 28 years of hosting sporting events, concerts and other high-profile activities.

7. Do non-Texas drivers pay for driving on North Texas toll roads? Tollways in North Texas include stretches of Dallas, Collin, Denton and Tarrant counties. Some highways in the Dallas-Fort Worth area also have TEXpress Lanes, which are toll lanes built within an existing highway to alleviate traffic.

8. Why does this Dallas chiropractor have dragons outside of his office? Three dragons — two red and one purple — guard the corner of Cedar Springs Road and Wycliff Avenue in Dallas’ Oak Lawn neighborhood.

9. What happened to the ‘World Famous’ Dallas Sportatorium? Before it became the pro wrestling landmark remembered by many today, the Sportatorium began as an octagonal hall that hosted gospel shows and hillbilly "sings" in 1936

10. What’s the history behind Dallas’ Old Parkland on Maple Avenue? Drivers along the Dallas North Tollway have probably seen one of the campus’ red-brick buildings with a grand copper dome and thought of the Old Parkland building as quite palatial. In reality, Parkland had a humble beginning as wooden clapboard hospital in 1894.

From left, Dallas mayoral candidates Mike Ablon, Lynn McBee, Miguel Solis, Jason Villalba, Regina Montoya, Scott Griggs and Albert Black acknowledge the crowd at the end of the Engage Dallas 2019 Mayoral Candidates Forum hosted by the Mayor’s Star Council at the Music Hall at Fair Park on Friday, March 8, 2019, in Dallas.
People walk among bluebonnets in Bluebonnet Park on Sunday, March 25, 2018, in Ennis, Texas. (Smiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News)

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Dallas’ Challenge: Creating Walkable Neighborhoods Without Leaving Communities Behind

Preston Center Pavilion and Square

As a recent report lays out in detail, walkable urban neighborhoods provide vast economic opportunity. The “WalkUP Wake-Up Call” identifies 38 walkable neighborhoods as existing in the Dallas-Fort Worth Area. These account for 12 percent of North Texas’ entire gross regional product. They fuel more efficient economies, and developers have taken notice. About a quarter of all of DFW’s multifamily rental housing went into those 38 areas during the last real estate cycle. (Our Peter Simek wrote about the study previously.)

However, there aren’t many urban areas that have managed to become booming economic engines without pricing out a significant portion of the populace. It’s partly an issue of supply and demand—these are intensely desirable places to live and work, but they occupy just .12 of one percent of the region’s land mass. This follows conventional wisdom about displacement in our city, too. These neighborhoods sport rents that are 37 percent higher than the regional average, making affordability difficult for many, concentrating those who can afford it. Building a more walkable future equitably becomes a trickier proposition that begins with a simple choice, says Chris Leinberger, a professor and chair of the Center for Real Estate & Urban Analysis at George Washington University, which conducted the study.

“The real issue is having the intention to do this,” Leinberger says.

Within the study, each of the 38 WalkUPs are grouped into tiers—platinum, gold, silver, and copper—based on both economic and social equity indicators. The equity groupings are a reflection of housing prices, transit accessibility, and the area’s mix of rental and for-sale housing. Leinberger’s team created an index to consider those factors as they relate to one another.

When the team studied other regions, they found in the equity category a near-even distribution between gold and silver—plenty of neighborhoods have good access to public transit and somewhat mixed housing costs. Here, that’s not the case. Of the 38 WalkUPs, only one received a platinum rating for social equity. Relative to the region’s other WalkUPs, East Jefferson, in North Oak Cliff, performed best. Just four (Baylor University Medical Center in Old East Dallas, Magnolia/Fairmount in Fort Worth, the Bishop Arts District, and Lower Greenville) received a gold rating. That leaves a whole mess of development in the silver range, and two dipping into copper. Meaning prices are high and access to public transportation is poor.

“My personal interpretation would be there’s something going on here—in terms of how housing and transportation are regulated and organized—that is a social problem,” says Tracy Loh, a senior data scientist with the center.

Several mayoral candidates have made displacement and transit access a key piece of their campaign platforms. But outside of lobbying our elected officials to make policy changes, how can the city produce more equitable urban development? It’s easy to imagine shadowy New York-based real estate investment trusts shoving high-dollar developments in every neighborhood that’s the least bit walkable to make a sure profit. But Loh says there are ways to partner with community members so that the existing community is not viewed as a commodity.

“There’s a need for leadership and there’s a need for leadership to be well-capitalized,” she says. “When you hear about a success story in these environments, it’s never, ‘We all just wanted to do the right thing.’ It’s, ‘We got organized, and we raised half a billion dollars.’”

The study identifies potential for more walkable urban areas across DFW. In Dallas, it pegs Fair Park, Zoo Park, Lake Cliff, and the DART Royal Lane Station. Getting there will take key improvements in the city’s transportation ecosystem.

“You have continued to sprawl more and more toward the fringe,” says Leinberger. “That fringe is 40 miles from downtown Dallas. Folks that live around Fair Park and south have a choice to either not participate in society or drive horrendous distances at great financial cost.”

And then there are the areas that have succeeded in becoming walkable economic machines but lag behind in the measures used to identify equity. In grouping the 38 WalkUPs into economic tiers, the study considers metrics like asking rent per square foot, place-level gross regional product, and total jobs per acre. So let’s take Preston Center, the study’s only platinum economic rating. When it comes to social equity, it’s one of the two worst WalkUPs in the region, receiving a copper rating alongside Southlake Town Center.

Fixing that calls for creativity. Leinberger suggests inclusionary zoning, requiring 15 percent of all new housing units meet the federal standard for subsidized housing projects. Without diving into the way its calculated, a family making $61,760 a year in DFW would spend $1,544 a month in rent on what would be considered affordable housing. Leinberger also suggests developing public land for use toward cheaper units. And he suggests working toward a goal in which everyone employed in the city center would be able to afford living there.

The zoning around Preston Center is a particularly hot-button issue, one that drew former mayor Laura Miller out of public office retirement for a City Council run. (She’ll debate sitting Councilwoman Jennifer Staubach Gates about the neighborhood and more later this month.)

Above all, making equitable changes in Preston Center starts with willingness, same as anywhere, says Leinberger.

“For Dallas, this is one of those fat and dumb situations. You’re fat and dumb,” he says.

Conventional wisdom would be not to change anything. But the economy is beginning to demand walkable urban places. He points to Amazon’s prioritization of walkable urban space in its pursuit of a home for its HQ2.

“Nobody’s saying that Dallas should forego the car, forego single-family housing, forego regional malls,” he says. “We’re just saying add more arrows to the quiver.”

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Firefighters battle 3-alarm blaze at Texas apartment complex

DALLAS, Texas (KWTX) Firefighters endured bitterly cold temperatures early Monday as they battled a three-alarm blaze at a Dallas apartment complex.

(CNN VAN photo)

Crews arrived at around 5:30 a.m. Monday at the complex on Holly Hill Drive near Greenville Avenue.

The fire quickly went from one to three alarms as flames and smoke shot from some of the buildings.

About 70 firefighters battled the flames.

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New downtown Dallas apartment high-rise includes affordable units

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Developers plan to break ground soon on a high-rise apartment project on downtown Dallas’ eastern edge that will provide affordable housing.

Real estate firm Matthews Southwest plans to construct the apartment tower at 2400 Bryan Street next door to the historic Dallas High School building.

The 15-story building will have about 230 apartments, with more than 100 of the units reserved for below-market rents. Residents in the planned project would have to earn between 30 percent and 60 percent of the area’s median household income to qualify for the affordable rental units.

A parking garage and almost 10,000 square feet of retail are also planned for building, which overlooks the U.S. Highway 75 overpass.

Architect Perkins + Will designed the angular building along DART’s rail line with a concrete, brick and glass exterior. Matthews Southwest filed building permits for more than 448,500 square feet of construction valued at almost $49.4 million.

The same developer completed a $50 million restoration of the 1907 Dallas High School next door at Pearl and Bryan streets. Matthews Southwest also developed the downtown Omni Dallas convention hotel, which opened in 2011.

Part of the new apartment project will be funded with low-income housing tax credits from the state of Texas.

"We expect to close with our tax credit investor and financing and provide the notice to proceed to our general contractor in early to mid-April," developer Jack Matthews said in an email. "There will be 18 months of construction to get our first units occupied in fourth-quarter 2020."

The 15-story 2400 Bryan project will include apartments and retail.

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Mediation scheduled for Ford, Reagor-Dykes in Dallas

Last week, Judge Robert Jones ordered Ford to attend the mediation with Reagor-Dykes. It has now been set for Monday, Feb. 25 and Tuesday, Feb. 26 in Dallas.

During last week’s hearing, Reagor-Dykes attorney Marcus Helt told Judge Jones that current partner Rick Dykes has agreed to remove himself from all involvement in any plan moving forward. Helt also voiced frustration for the more than 900 consumer issues with tax, title and licenses still to be resolved, although he did agree there were extenuating circumstances like the recent government shutdown that impacted the process. He was hopeful mediation could be the answer.

Ford Motor Credit attorney Don Cram then spoke with Judge Jones, telling the court Ford had not received a detailed proposal until Wednesday, and that they were studying it. “We are considering the latest proposal and if my client deems it has legs we might be interested, however we oppose any mediation at this point.”

Jones sided with Reagor-Dykes in demanding Ford Motor Credit come to the table, ordering them to attend and participate in mediation. “I want resolving consumer issues to be a priority in this mediation,” Jones told the court.

Tuesday afternoon KCBD learned Marc McDougal and representatives of the McDougal Group will not be at the meeting, saying there was ‘no reason’ to attend.

An emergency hearing was held Tuesday in Judge Jones’ court to discuss an issue brought by Lubbock’s AimBank, but no decision was made. Jones ruled the Tuesday hearing will be discussed in further detail during the next scheduled hearing, set for Wednesday, Feb. 20 at 1:30 p.m.

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Residents Pushed Out of East Dallas Apartment Complex Given More Time to Find New Home

Residents Booted From Apartment Complex Granted ExtensionTenants at an Old East Dallas apartment complex were supposed to move out on Sunday, but have now been given more time to find a new home. (Published Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019)

Tenants at an Old East Dallas apartment complex were supposed to move out on Sunday, but have been given more time to find a new home.

Residents at the Bryan Song Apartments were given notices on Dec. 10 that they had to be out of the complex by Feb. 10.

However, residents said they now have about two extra months to move out.

The Bryan Song Apartments are being torn down to make room for a new, high-end development.

Fewer couples may be inclined to celebrate Valentine’s Day this year, but those who do are slated to break the bank wooing their significant other come Feb. 14.

(Published 4 hours ago)

Many residents were moving out of the apartments Sunday when NBC 5 stopped by the complex.

Chirstyal Rogers said she has lived at the apartment for about a year and a half.

Rogers said most of the tenants are either low-income or have federal housing vouchers.

She said she was relieved to have more time to move out, but said she still didn’t know where she was going to live next.

"I feel wonderful about it, because if not, a lot of people would be displaced right now," Rogers said.

Rogers also said she wished she had more money to help her relocate.

A surveillance video released by a transit authority in Cleveland shows a man stepping off a train to smoke a cigarette and then frantically chasing after it when it leaves the station with his baby on board.

(Published Friday, Feb. 8, 2019)

According to her, residents would receive $500 if they move out by April 1 and $250 if they move out later.

She said she was working with the Texas Tenant’s Association to try to get a bill in place to change current laws.

"I’m at least trying to get it where it’s at least 180 days notice, or at least $2,000 compensation before a person is uprooted from where they live," Rogers said.

NBC 5 reached out the development company who bought the complex, and had not heard back as of 5 p.m. Sunday.

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Mediterranean Estate In Dallas Includes Stunning Pool Area

DALLAS, TX — A massive kitchen, separate guest area, and three fireplaces are just some of the features included in this beautiful 8,223 square foot estate in North Dallas. The home was built in 1999 and is on the market for $2.3 million. Learn more about the listing below.

Price: $2,350,000Square Feet: 8,223Bedrooms: 4Bathrooms: 4 full and 3 half bathsBuilt: 1999Features: This idyllic Preston Hollow estate is situated on a double lot measuring .765 of an acre and offers a private entertainment oasis just minutes from city life. Featuring approximately 8, 223 SF with separate guest quarters (offering an add’l 585 SF) and a backyard paradise complete with resort style pool, 16 seat hot tub, custom putting green, large yard and bar. This custom home has been extensively updated with a master down, phenomenal master bath and closet, secondary master suite upstairs, media room, study, game room, 3 living areas, 3 fireplaces and an open floor plan that flows seamlessly from indoors to out.

This listing originally appeared on realtor.com. For more information and photos, click here.

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